How showing gratitude affects us?

September 20, 2019

We tend to underestimate the positive effects of our gratitude. Often we might not express our gratitude because we are unsure how the other person might react to it. What if it will be awkward? Maybe you will feel that way, but receiving positive feedback of any kind feels amazing. Making people around us happy makes us happy too, and according to research, it gives meaning to our lives and enhances our overall well-being. You can model your thoughts as an experienced craftsman can mold the clay by being grateful on others aiming to have a full cup of mental wellbeing.

Research shows that a conscious focus on gratitude increases experienced well-being and happiness. When was the last time you felt gratitude? What about the last time you expressed it? This blog will guide you to have more gratitude in your life, which is a powerful tool for a happy, healthy and meaningful life. And there isn't a better day to start than Today. But, you can start any day and feel the immediate impact on your wellbeing.

How gratitude affects you and me?

Research shows that a conscious focus on gratitude increases experienced well-being and happiness. It can reduce work related stress, improve quality of sleep and prevent depression. Feeling and expressing gratitude improves social relationships and makes us see and appreciate the positive in the world.

We tend to underestimate the positive effects of our gratitude. Often we might not express our gratitude because we are unsure how the other person might react to it. What if it will be awkward? Maybe you will feel that way, but receiving positive feedback of any kind feels amazing.

How can you practice gratitude?

There are several ways for practicing your gratitude. Following exercise applies to situations where you socially interact with others. You can easily practice gratitude remotely too: when messaging, calling or emailing. Keep practicing gratitude consciously for a week or more to make it a part of your daily life.

Show your gratitude

Starting from this moment, pay attention to the things that you are grateful for at work and in your free time. Say thank you to everyone who are somehow helpful or nice to you and be actually present when you say it. It could be your colleague, boss, salesperson of the cafeteria, your customer, your spouse or a bypasser that helps you somehow. If possible try to give positive feedback and really let the other person know how they made you feel.

Being conscious is one option. Another option is to write the things and words you have noticed into a gratitude journal. And you don't need to buy a gratitude journal, pen and paper is enough. Also when writing at work or home the gratitude journal it is important you do or at least aim to do it on daily basis. Personally we have noticed that writing the things in the evening also has an impact on getting a good night sleep.

Make gratitude a part of your daily life

If it feels hard to find things that you are grateful for remember that those things don’t need to be big or special. Life doesn’t have to be perfect to be able to be grateful and enjoy it. Feeling and showing gratitude for small and ordinary things reminds us to appreciate life as it is and therefore be happy and feel physically better too.

Start today

Did someone help you, be kind or nice to you today? Or can you think of a person whose work or effort you appreciate? Why not thank them or give them positive feedback right now? If you don't feel like expressing your gratitude now, keep gratitude in mind and express it later today. Or start writing the gratitude journal. Try how it feels, you might be surprised!

Even science shows that gratitude pays off

The research suggests that gratitude is related to a variety of clinically relevant phenomena, including psychopathology (particularly depression), adaptive personality characteristics, positive social relationships, and physical health (particularly stress and sleep). Longitudinal and experimental work suggests that the benefits of gratitude to well-being may be causal. Gratitude is relevant to clinical psychology due to (a) strong explanatory power in understanding well-being, and (b) the potential of improving well-being through fostering gratitude with simple exercises. Let's switch to plain English and our everyday (work) life.

Key insight from this blog

  • Focusing consciously on gratitude can increase my experienced well-being and happiness by tuning my thoughts to positive.

  • Gratitude can reduce my work related stress, improve my quality of sleep, prevent depression and improve social relationships.

  • Showing gratitude to other people in daily life can make myself and people around me happier.

  • Try out the the gratitude journal with just pen and paper.

Find out how Emooter can help you and your team to improve well-being at work — Book a demo

We welcome new friends